Trading Range

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DEFINITION of 'Trading Range'

The spread between the high and low prices traded during a period of time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trading Range'

When a stock breaks through or falls below its trading range after several days of trading in a range, it usually means there is momentum (positive or negative) building.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Range

    A stock's low and high prices for a particular trading period, ...
  2. Opening Range

    The highest and lowest prices of a security during the first ...
  3. Closing Range

    The band of prices that a security trades at in a specified period, ...
  4. 52-Week Range

    The lowest and highest prices at which a stock has traded in ...
  5. Spread

    1. The difference between the bid and the ask price of a security ...
  6. Breakout

    A price movement through an identified level of support or resistance, ...
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