Trailing EPS


DEFINITION of 'Trailing EPS'

The sum of a company's earnings per share for the previous four quarters.


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The descriptive word "trailing" implies "previous years" versus a present or forward EPS. Most recorded and quoted EPS values are trailing.

  1. Earnings Per Share - EPS

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  2. Primary Earnings Per Share (EPS)

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    The sum of a company's price-to-earnings, calculated by taking ...
  4. Trailing Twelve Months - TTM

    The timeframe of the past 12 months used for reporting financial ...
  5. Rolling EPS

    A measure of a company's earnings per share based on the previous ...
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