Transaction Exposure


DEFINITION of 'Transaction Exposure'

The risk, faced by companies involved in international trade, that currency exchange rates will change after the companies have already entered into financial obligations. Such exposure to fluctuating exchange rates can lead to major losses for firms.

BREAKING DOWN 'Transaction Exposure'

Often, when a company identifies such exposure to changing exchange rates, it will choose to implement a hedging strategy, using forward rates to lock in an exchange rate and thus eliminate the exposure to the risk.

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  5. Transaction

    1. An agreement between a buyer and a seller to exchange goods, ...
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    The risk that a company's equities, assets, liabilities or income ...
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