Transfer Of Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Transfer Of Risk'

The underlying tenet behind insurance transactions. The purpose of this action is to take a specific risk, which is detailed in the insurance contract, and pass it from one party who does not wish to have this risk (the insured) to a party who is willing to take on the risk for a fee, or premium (the insurer).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Transfer Of Risk'

For example, whenever someone purchases home insurance, he or she is essentially paying an insurance company to take the risk involved with owning a home. In the event that something does happen to the house, such as property damage from a fire or natural disaster, the insurance company will be responsible for dealing with any resulting consequences.

In today's financial marketplace, insurance instruments have grown more and more intricate and complex, but the transfer of risk is the one requirement that is always met in any insurance contract.

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