Transfer Procedures


DEFINITION of 'Transfer Procedures'

The procedure by which ownership of a stock moves from one party to another. The transfer agent follows a detailed, documented series of steps governed by the SEC to ensure that a transaction has been completed.

BREAKING DOWN 'Transfer Procedures'

The transfer agent has record of the personal details of an owner of a share. And when a share's ownership changes, the transfer agent cancels the stock certificate of the seller and makes a new stock certificate for the buyer.

  1. Endorser

    A person who is authorized to sign a negotiable security in order ...
  2. Stock

    A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation ...
  3. Free Carrier - FCA

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named ...
  4. Transfer

    A change in ownership of an asset, or a movement of funds and/or ...
  5. Custody-Only Trading

    A system in which shares must be registered to the holder by ...
  6. Clowngrade

    An upgrade or downgrade of a security for reasons considered ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Principal Trading and Agency Trading

    Ever wonder what happens behind the scenes when you buy or sell a stock? Read on and find out!
  2. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  3. Brokers

    How RIAs and Independent Broker-Dealers Differ

    There are many types of financial planners. Here we break down what sets RIAs apart from independent broker-dealers.
  4. Professionals

    The Pros and Cons of a Hybrid Advisor Practice

    Deciding whether or not operating as a hybrid makes sense for your practice? Consider the following first.
  5. Brokers

    How to Find Wealthier Financial Advisory Clients

    Most financial advisors are eager to add more and wealthier clients to their practice. Here's what it takes.
  6. Professionals

    Career Advice: Stockbroker Vs. Financial Advisor

    Read a detailed comparison between life as a stockbroker versus a financial advisor; find out how the two are different and which one is best for you.
  7. Investing Basics

    Why Use a Discount Broker?

    A discount broker is a stockbroker that does not offer clients investment advice, but trades shares for a smaller commission than a full-service broker.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Is A Trading Account?

    A trading account enables an investor to buy and sell securities.
  9. Professionals

    Why Realtors Have Fiduciary Responsibilities

    Find out why real estate agents are considered to have a legal fiduciary responsibility to uphold the best interests of their clients.
  10. Investing Basics

    Understanding Brokerage Fees

    Agents charge brokerage fees for facilitating transactions between buyers and sellers.
  1. What is the interest rate offered on a typical margin account?

    Interest rates on margin accounts vary according to the size of the loan and the brokerage firm being used. Generally, interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the cost of a share purchase?

    When investors purchase shares of stock, the price paid includes two components: the price of the stock and the fee charged ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between fee-based advisors and commission-based advisors?

    The difference between a fee-based adviser and a commission-based adviser is that the former collects a flat fee for investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a custodian bank and a mutual fund custodian?

    Custodian banks and mutual fund custodians, commonly known as mutual fund corporations, perform very similar roles for different ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does an insurance broker make money?

    An insurance broker makes money off commissions from selling insurance to individuals or businesses. Most commissions are ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does the variance between the bid and ask price of a stock mean?

    The variance between a security's bid price and its ask price, also known as the bid-ask spread, represents the different ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Ex Works (EXW)

    An international trade term requiring the seller to make goods ready for pickup at his or her own place of business. All ...
  2. Letter of Intent - LOI

    A document outlining the terms of an agreement before it is finalized. LOIs are usually not legally binding in their entirety. ...
  3. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  4. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  5. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  6. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!