Translation Exposure

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Translation Exposure'

The risk that a company's equities, assets, liabilities or income will change in value as a result of exchange rate changes. This occurs when a firm denominates a portion of its equities, assets, liabilities or income in a foreign currency.


Also known as "accounting exposure".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Translation Exposure'

Accountants use various methods to insulate firms from these types of risks, such as consolidation techniques for the firm's financial statements and the use of the most effective cost accounting evaluation procedures. In many cases, this exposure will be recorded in the financial statements as an exchange rate gain (or loss).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Exchange Rate

    The price of a nation’s currency in terms of another currency. ...
  2. Income

    Money that an individual or business receives in exchange for ...
  3. Cumulative Translation Adjustment ...

    An entry in the comprehensive income section of a translated ...
  4. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  5. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
  6. Equity

    1. A stock or any other security representing an ownership interest. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are foreign exchange rates affected by commodity price fluctuations?

    In the foreign exchange (forex) market, currency valuations move up and down as a result of many factors, including interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why would you use the TTM (trailing twelve months) rather than the data from the ...

    Public companies report their yearly financial statements along with an annual report. However, financial professionals are ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is it important for an investor to understand business accounting?

    Investors use financial statements to obtain valuable information used in valuation and credit analysis of companies. Therefore, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why does the efficient market hypothesis state that technical analysis is bunk?

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) suggests that markets are informationally efficient. This means that historical prices ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the business consequences of using FIFO vs. LIFO accounting methods?

    If a company uses a first-in, first-out accounting method (FIFO), it's likely that its reported earnings will be higher than ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do you use a financial calculator to determine present value?

    Determining the present value of a given cash flow is based on the concept that money today is inherently worth more than ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Currency Exchange: Floating Rate Vs. Fixed Rate

    Baffled by exchange rates? Wonder why some currencies fluctuate while others are pegged? This article has the answers.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    6 Factors That Influence Exchange Rates

    Find out how a currency's relative value reflects a country's economic health and impacts your investment returns.
  3. Forex Education

    Dual And Multiple Exchange Rates 101

    Why would a country choose to implement dual or multiple exchange rates? It's risky, but it can work.
  4. Investing

    Why International Diversification Matters Today

    Given the breadth and diversity of the U.S. economy and market, many U.S. investors feel comfortable keeping their money within U.S. borders.
  5. Economics

    Explaining the EBITDA Margin

    EBITDA margin can provide an investor with a cleaner view of a company's core profitability.
  6. Economics

    The U.S. Economy May Be Stronger Than You Think

    While the economic performance in the U.S. broadly disappointed in the first quarter, temporary factors presented one-off events that depressed output.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  9. Investing News

    Cost-Free Connection Of Target Groups To Marketers

    ZipDial spotted a niche marketing opportunity in the area of “missed calls” and developed a business around it. Here is how ZipDial works and its benefits.
  10. Investing News

    The Funds Keep Flowing Into Indian Tech Startups

    Investors are increasingly turning their attention to Indian tech startup companies. Billions of dollars are flowing into the startup sector in India.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center