Translation Risk

DEFINITION of 'Translation Risk'

The exchange rate risk associated with companies that deal in foreign currencies or list foreign assets on their balance sheets. The greater the proportion of asset, liability and equity classes denominated in a foreign currency, the greater the translation risk.

BREAKING DOWN 'Translation Risk'

This poses a serious threat for companies conducting business in foreign markets. Exchange rates usually change between quarterly financial statements, causing significant variances between the reported figures. Companies attempt to minimize these transaction risks by purchasing currency swaps or hedging through futures contracts.

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