Transposition Error

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DEFINITION of 'Transposition Error'

A simple error of data entry. Transposition errors occur when two digits that are either individual or part of a larger sequence of numbers are reversed (transposed) when posting a transaction. Although this error is small and unintentional, it can result in huge financial losses or errors in some instances.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Transposition Error'

When two adjacent numbers are transposed, the resulting mathematical error will always be divisible by 9 (e.g. (72-27)/9 = 5). Bank tellers can use this rule to quickly find their errors in many cases. Transposition errors also occur in accounting firms, brokerages and all other areas of finance.

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