DEFINITION of 'Treasury DRIP'

A dividend reinvestment plan that uses dividends to purchase more shares directly from the company's treasury stock. Oftentimes, because the company is issuing the shares, it will offer the shareholder a small discount on the share price; this discount typically ranges from 2-4%.

BREAKING DOWN 'Treasury DRIP'

The other common type of dividend reinvestment plan is the market DRIP. In a market drip, a company uses its cash dividends to purchase shares on the open market, rather than from its treasury. Using a DRIP can help companies to develop investor loyalty and a stable shareholder base. The advantages to shareholders include convenience and a lack of commission charges on acquiring new shares through a DRIP program

RELATED TERMS
  1. Dividend Reinvestment Plan - DRIP

    A plan offered by a corporation that allows investors to reinvest ...
  2. SEC Form S-3D

    A filing that publicly-traded companies must submit to the SEC's ...
  3. Dividend

    A distribution of a portion of a company's earnings, decided ...
  4. Cash-And-Stock Dividend

    A corporation distributing earnings to its shareholders as both ...
  5. Dividend Yield

    A financial ratio that shows how much a company pays out in dividends ...
  6. Distribution Reinvestment

    A process whereby the distribution from a limited partnership, ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    5 Ways to Lose Money With a Dividend Reinvestment Plan

    Enrolling in a dividend reinvestment plan can backfire if you're not using it wisely, costing you money in the process.
  2. Investing

    How Does a Dividend Reinvestment Plan Work?

    A dividend reinvestment plan allows investors to use their dividends to purchase more shares of the corporation’s stock, rather than receiving payment.
  3. Retirement

    Reinvesting Dividends Pays in the Long Run

    Find out why dividend reinvestment is one of the easiest ways to grow wealth, including how this tactic can increase your investment income over time.
  4. Investing

    Which Is Best: Cash Dividend Or Stock Dividend?

    Cash dividends are paid to shareholders when a company decides not to use the money for operations, but instead, transfer economic value to its shareholders.
  5. Investing

    How to Reinvest Dividends from ETFs

    Learn about reinvesting ETF dividends, including the benefits and drawbacks of dividend reinvestment plans (DRIPs) and manual reinvestment.
  6. Retirement

    Should Retirees Reinvest Their Dividends?

    Find out why dividend reinvestment may or may not be the right choice for retirees, depending on their financial needs and investment goals.
  7. Investing

    How Dividends Work For Investors

    Find out how a company can put its profits directly into your hands.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are dividends usually paid out?

    Discover the two compensation methods commonly used by companies and mutual funds to make dividend payments on equity investments. Read Answer >>
  2. Which is better a cash dividend or a stock dividend?

    The purpose of dividends is to return wealth back to the shareholders of a company. There are two main types of dividends: ... Read Answer >>
  3. What are the dividend reinvestment options for a mutual fund?

    Learn about the options that shareholders have for dividend distributions made by mutual funds and why a shareholder may ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is a DRIP?

    The word "DRIP" is an acronym for "dividend reinvestment plan", but "DRIP" also happens to describe the way the plan works. ... Read Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect retained earnings?

    Find out how distribution of dividends affects a company's retained earnings, including the difference between cash dividends ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Treynor Ratio

    A ratio developed by Jack Treynor that measures returns earned in excess of that which could have been earned on a riskless ...
  2. Buyback

    The repurchase of outstanding shares (repurchase) by a company in order to reduce the number of shares on the market. Companies ...
  3. Tax Refund

    A tax refund is a refund on taxes paid to an individual or household when the actual tax liability is less than the amount ...
  4. Gross Domestic Product - GDP

    The monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country's borders in a specific time period, ...
  5. Inflation

    The rate at which the general level of prices for goods and services is rising and, consequently, the purchasing power of ...
  6. Merchandising

    Merchandising is any act of promoting goods or services for retail sale, including marketing strategies, display design and ...
Trading Center