Treasury General Account

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DEFINITION of 'Treasury General Account'

The general checking account used by the Department of the Treasury. The Treasury General Account is held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. All official payments of the U.S. government are made from this account.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Treasury General Account'

The Treasury General Account also holds money that is credited to the government in the form of monetized gold.

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