Treasury Secretary

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DEFINITION of 'Treasury Secretary'

The Secretary of the Treasury is a member of the Presidential cabinet. This person is the acting head of the Department of the Treasury, and deals with all financial and monetary matters directly relating to the government. The secretary is the principal economic advisor of the President and plays a major role in formulating economic policy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Treasury Secretary'

The Secretary of the Treasury position is roughly equivalent to the finance minister post found in many foreign governments. In 2003, a number of agencies were split away from the Department of the Treasury and reassigned to the Department of Homeland Security. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Customs Service and the Secret Service were among those sent over.

The Treasury Secretary is fifth in the presidential line of succession

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