Treasury Secretary

DEFINITION of 'Treasury Secretary'

The Secretary of the Treasury is a member of the Presidential cabinet. This person is the acting head of the Department of the Treasury, and deals with all financial and monetary matters directly relating to the government. The secretary is the principal economic advisor of the President and plays a major role in formulating economic policy.

BREAKING DOWN 'Treasury Secretary'

The Secretary of the Treasury position is roughly equivalent to the finance minister post found in many foreign governments. In 2003, a number of agencies were split away from the Department of the Treasury and reassigned to the Department of Homeland Security. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Customs Service and the Secret Service were among those sent over.

The Treasury Secretary is fifth in the presidential line of succession

RELATED TERMS
  1. Monetary Accord Of 1951

    A 1951 agreement between the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and ...
  2. U.S. Treasury

    Created in 1798, the United States Department of the Treasury ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt ...
  4. Tim Geithner

    The 75th United States Secretary of the Treasury. Geithner was ...
  5. Henry Paulson

    Henry Paulson served as the 74th U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. ...
  6. Treasury General Account

    The general checking account used by the Department of the Treasury. ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    20 Investments: Treasuries

    What Is It? Also known as "government securities", treasuries are a debt obligation of a national government. Because they are backed by the credit and taxing power of a country, they are regarded ...
  2. Term

    Understanding Treasury Yield

    Treasury yield refers to the return on an investment in a U.S. government debt obligation, such as a bill, note or bond.
  3. Professionals

    Types Of Government Securities

    Series EE Bonds: The series EE bonds are commonly known as savings bonds. They are purchased directly from the US government at a discount from their face value, typically 50%. The Series EE ...
  4. Investing Basics

    What is Treasury Stock?

    Treasury stock is a company’s own stock that it holds in its treasury for later use.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What's a 10-Year Treasury Note?

    A 10-year Treasury note is an intermediate debt obligation issued by the United States government, and with a ten-year maturity date.
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Introduction to Treasury Securities

    Purchasing bonds that are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government can provide steady guaranteed income and peace of mind. Knowing the characteristics of each type of treasury ...
  7. Active Trading

    Buy Treasuries Directly From The Fed

    If you want government securities, go straight to the source. We'll show you how.
  8. Professionals

    U.S. Government Securities

    FINRA Series 6 Exam Study Guide - U.S. Government Securities. This section explains the different types of US government securities like treasury bills, notes and bonds.
  9. Professionals

    U.S. Government Securities

    FINRA/NASAA Series 65: Section 8 U.S. Government Securities. In this section treasury bills, treasury notes, treasury bonds, treasury STRIPS and TIPS.
  10. Professionals

    U.S. Government Bonds and Agency Securities

    U.S. Government Bonds and Agency Securities
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the economic impacts of specialization?

    Read about the economic impacts of specialization and the division of labor, and see why individuals, firms and even countries ... Read Answer >>
  2. Which economic factors impact treasury yields?

    Discover the economic factors that impact Treasury yields. Treasury yields are the benchmark yield for the rest of the world, ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why are treasury bond yields important to investors of other securities?

    Learn about the wide-ranging impact of U.S. Treasury Bond yields on all other interest-bearing instruments in the economy ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between the Daily Treasury Long-Term Rates and the Daily Treasury ...

    Find out more about the daily Treasury long-term rates, daily Treasury yield curve rates and the difference between these ... Read Answer >>
  5. How are treasury bills taxed?

    Read about how the Internal Revenue Service collects taxes on treasury bills purchased from the United States government ... Read Answer >>
  6. When are treasury bills best to use in a portfolio?

    Understand the role that U.S. Treasury bills can play in an investment portfolio and why they represent one of the most liquid ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Law Of Demand

    A microeconomic law that states that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, consumer ...
  2. Cost Of Debt

    The effective rate that a company pays on its current debt. This can be measured in either before- or after-tax returns; ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will ...
  5. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  6. Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial transactions for its members. Established in 1973, the ...
Trading Center