Treasury Lock

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DEFINITION of 'Treasury Lock'

A hedging tool used to manage interest-rate risk by effectively securing the current day's interest rates on federal government securities, to cover future expenses that will be financed by borrowing. Treasury locks are a type of customized derivative security that usually have a duration of one week to 12 months. They are cash settled, usually on a net basis, without the actual purchase of any Treasuries.

BREAKING DOWN 'Treasury Lock'

The parties involved in a Treasury lock, depending on the respective sides of the transaction, pay or receive the difference between the lock price and market interest rates. Treasury locks are commonly used by companies that plan to issue debt in the future, but want the security of knowing what interest rate they will pay on that debt.

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