Treasury Stock Method

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Treasury Stock Method'

The component of the diluted earnings per share denominator that includes the net of new shares potentially created by unexercised in-the-money warrants and options. This method assumes that the proceeds that a company receives from an in-the-money option exercise are used to repurchase common shares in the market.

In order to comply with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the treasury stock method must be used by a company when computing its diluted earnings per share (EPS).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Treasury Stock Method'

The net of new shares that are potentially created is calculated by taking the number of shares that the in-the-money options purchase, then subtracting the number of common shares that the company can purchase from the market with the option proceeds. This adds to the total number of shares in the denominator and lowers the EPS number.

For example, assume that a company currently has in-the-money options that cover 10,000 shares with an exercise price of $50. If the current market price is $100, the options are in-the-money and, based on the treasury method, need to be added to the diluted EPS denominator. The proceeds the company will receive will be $500,000 ($50 x 10,000), which allows them to repurchase 5,000 shares on the market ($500,000/$100). Therefore, the net of new shares is 5,000 (10,000 option shares - 5,000 repurchased shares).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Earnings Per Share - EPS

    The portion of a company's profit allocated to each outstanding ...
  2. Diluted Earnings Per Share - Diluted ...

    A performance metric used to gauge the quality of a company's ...
  3. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  4. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
  5. Exercise Price

    The price at which the underlying security can be purchased (call ...
  6. Warrant

    A derivative security that gives the holder the right to purchase ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    The 5 Types Of Earnings Per Share

    A look at the five varieties of EPS and what each represents can help an investor determine whether a company is a good value, or not.
  2. Markets

    How To Evaluate The Quality Of EPS

    Companies can manipulate their numbers, so you need to learn how to determine the accuracy of EPS.
  3. Options & Futures

    Getting The Real Earnings

    EPS helps investors analyze earnings in relation to changes in new-share capital.
  4. Economics

    Understanding the Top Line

    Top line refers to a company’s gross sales without any reductions for discounts or returns.
  5. Economics

    What's an Allowance for Doubtful Accounts?

    The allowance for doubtful accounts represents the percentage of the accounts receivable the company expects to write-off as uncollectible.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Activity Ratios

    Activity ratios measure how effectively a business uses its assets.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is Accrued Income?

    In a mutual fund, accrued income is earnings that have accumulated over the year, but have not yet been paid out to shareholders.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
  9. Investing Basics

    How To Create Capital Protected Investment Using Options?

    Does "Capital-Protection" guarantee in an investment product sound attractive? Wait! Here's how you can create a better one for yourself, at low-cost!
  10. Options & Futures

    How to Make Money by Trading Index Options

    Index options are less volatile and more liquid than regular options. Understand how to trade index options with this simple introduction.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!