Trending Market

DEFINITION of 'Trending Market'

A market that is trending in one direction or another. A bull market is trending upward, while a bear market is trending downward. A trending market can be classified as such for either the short, mid or long term.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trending Market'

Trending markets are of primary interest in technical analysis. Technical analysts maintain that trending markets occur with some degree of regularity and predictability. The ability to correctly discern these trends can have a substantial impact on investment returns.

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