Trilateral Commission

DEFINITION of 'Trilateral Commission'

From the site at Trilateral.org:

The Trilateral Commission is a non-governmental policy-oriented discussion group of about 325 distinguished citizens from North America, the European Union, and Japan which seeks to foster mutual issues for which these principal democratic industrialized regions share leadership responsibilities.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trilateral Commission'

A group consisting of world leaders, formed for the purpose of creating a wider international community that fosters cooperation. This commission was founded by David Rockefeller in 1973 as a partnership between private citizens in North America, Europe, and Japan. It has now expanded to include many countries outside of the original 3 locations.

If you look at a list of past and present Trilateralists, it reads like the who's who of the business world. Some of the notable members include former U.S. Presidents and diplomats before they entered their public positions. This commission has garnered much controversy over its existence.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Asian Development Bank

    Founded in 1966, its headquarters are in Manila, Philippines. ...
  2. Commission Broker

    Someone who gets paid by the brokerage company for which he works ...
  3. Half Commission Man

    A half commission man is an individual who introduces clients ...
  4. Organization for Economic Cooperation ...

    A group of 30 member countries that discuss and develop economic ...
  5. Credit Union

    Member-owned financial co-operative. These institutions are created ...
  6. Alien

    Any person who is not a citizen of the country in which he or ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    OptionsXpress - Brokerage Review – Fee Structure And Tools

    Commission / Fee StructureLike many brokerages, commissions at optionsXpress are based in part on the magnitude and volume of an investor's business. Those investors who conduct more than 35 ...
  2. Economics

    When Is Dual Citizenship Not A Good Idea?

    There are many ways to become a dual citizen, and doing so offers certain benefits. But there are a few disadvantages, as well.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Economic Changes to Expect if a Democrat Wins in 2016

    Discover the potential economic effects of a Democratic White House win in 2016, including higher taxes for the wealthy and tighter banking regulations.
  4. Economics

    How Leadership Impacts Investments

    Investors often overlook a company’s leadership when evaluating an opportunity, but it’s an important quality to consider.
  5. Personal Finance

    Are Labor Unions Effective?

    This article examines some of the pros and cons associated with organized labor.
  6. Economics

    Advantages And Disadvantages Of Dual Citizenship

    A person with dual citizenship is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Dual citizenship is complex, so it’s important to understand the pros and cons.
  7. Taxes

    Is It Smart To Get Dual Citizenship?

    When does it make sense to be a citizen of the U.S. and somewhere else? Here are the plusses and negatives of a dual citizenship.
  8. Economics

    J.D. Rockefeller: From Oil Baron To Billionaire

    More than 70 years after his death, this man remains one of the great figures of Wall Street.
  9. Personal Finance

    Kim Jong Il's Death And The Markets

    The sudden change in leadership in North Korea brings even more uncertainty to the markets.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Can The U.S. Super Committee Solve The Debt Crisis?

    Find out about this committee's tactics and members, and see whether you think they can solve America's financial problems.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How much money do I need to start trading?

    The step toward becoming an active trader is a big one, because the world of active trading is quite different from that ... Read Answer >>
  2. What's the smallest number of shares I can buy?

    Unlike mutual funds, which can be purchased in fractional units, shares of stock cannot be divided. So, the smallest number ... Read Answer >>
  3. How are a mutual fund's C shares different from A and B shares?

    Learn how a class C share differs from a class A or B share in relation to a mutual fund. Read Answer >>
  4. Does the FDIC cover credit unions?

    Learn whether or not the FDIC insures your funds at a credit union, and what types of insurance are available at the different ... Read Answer >>
  5. How often do mutual funds report their holdings?

    Learn how mutual funds are required by the Securities and Exchange Commission to disclose their portfolio holdings on a quarterly ... Read Answer >>
  6. Should mutual funds be subject to more regulation?

    Understand whether mutual funds need stricter regulation. Learn what types of current and future regulations have been put ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Demand Curve

    The demand curve is a graphical representation of the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity ...
  2. Goldilocks Economy

    An economy that is not so hot that it causes inflation, and not so cold that it causes a recession. This term is used to ...
  3. White Squire

    Very similar to a "white knight", but instead of purchasing a majority interest, the squire purchases a lesser interest in ...
  4. MACD Technical Indicator

    Moving Average Convergence Divergence (or MACD) is a trend-following momentum indicator that shows the relationship between ...
  5. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    Over-The-Counter (or OTC) is a security traded in some context other than on a formal exchange such as the NYSE, TSX, AMEX, ...
  6. Quarter - Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4

    A three-month period on a financial calendar that acts as a basis for the reporting of earnings and the paying of dividends.
Trading Center