Trough

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DEFINITION of 'Trough'

The stage of the economy's business cycle that marks the end of a period of declining business activity and the transition to expansion.

Trough

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trough'

In general, the business cycle is said to go through expansion, then the peak, followed by contraction, and then it finally bottoms out with the trough.

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