Trust Certificate

DEFINITION of 'Trust Certificate'

A bond or debt investment, usually in a public corporation, that is backed by other assets which serve a purpose similar to collateral. If the company experiences difficulty making payments, the assets may be seized or sold to help specific trust certificate holders recover a portion of their investment. The potential type of company assets used to create a trust certificate can vary, but most typically are other shares of company stock or physical equipment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trust Certificate'

Investors holding trust certificates usually experience a higher level of safety than investors owning unsecured or uncollateralized bonds. But, they also typically earn a lower level of interest than those investors willing to take greater risks. While that may sound like an attractive balance for some investors, investing in trust certificates can be complex because it requires both an understanding of a company's overall financial situation and the nature of the asset that underlies the trust certificate.

Special caution should be taken when investing in trust certificates with an underlying asset that is the same company's stock. If the company runs into financial trouble, the asset backing the trust certificate can become as worthless as the trust certificate itself.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Trust

    A fiduciary relationship in which one party, known as a trustor, ...
  2. Incorporated Trustee

    A corporation, usually a trust company, which is named as the ...
  3. Secured Debt

    Debt backed or secured by collateral to reduce the risk associated ...
  4. Unsecured Loan

    A loan that is issued and supported only by the borrower's creditworthiness, ...
  5. Equipment Trust Certificate

    A debt instrument that allows a company to take possession of ...
  6. Collateral Trust Bond

    A bond that is secured by a financial asset - such as stock or ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    3 Bonds You May Have Never Heard Of

    These lesser-known bonds may give your portfolio a boost when other investments products fall short.
  3. Insurance

    Investing In Securitized Products

    Securitized assets are customizable and have a wide range of yields, making them an attractive asset class.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  5. Retirement

    Collateralized Debt Obligations: From Boon To Burden

    CDOs were to be Wall Street's boon - instead they went bust. Find out what went wrong.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Apple Stock: An Earnings Case Study (AAPL)

    Discover an earnings case study on Apple, and learn about its EPS and revenue growth rates, and what analysts are projecting for Apple in 2016 and 2017.
  7. Term

    What Is Contractionary Policy?

    A contractionary policy is a macroeconomic tool used to slow down an economy.
  8. Investing

    The Difference Between Book and Market Value

    Book value is the price paid for an asset. It never changes as long as the asset is owned. Market value is the current price at which the asset can sell.
  9. Term

    What Is Corporate Inversion?

    Corporate inversion occurs when a U.S. company buys or combines with a foreign company in a country with a lower corporate tax rate.
  10. Investing News

    Comcast Acquires Dreamworks Animation for $3.8B (DWA, CMCSA)

    A quick look at what Comcast owns!
RELATED FAQS
  1. Is a money market account the same as a money market fund?

    Discover the differences between money market accounts and money market funds, including minimum balance requirements, withdrawal ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the 1003 mortgage application form?

    Learn about the 1003 mortgage application form, what information it requires and why this form is the industry standard for ... Read Answer >>
  3. What typically comprises a money market fund?

    Learn about the basic types of money market funds and discover how they are characterized by the types of investments that ... Read Answer >>
  4. How can I budget for both short-term expenses and long-term goals?

    The first step in planning for long-term goals is actually determining how much you spend on short-term expenses. Once you ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are common advantages of investing in large cap stocks?

    Learn what large-cap stocks are and how investors can benefit from common advantages of adding large-cap stocks to their ... Read Answer >>
  6. How old should you be to get life insurance?

    There's really no pre-determined age when it suddenly becomes necessary to take out a life insurance policy. However, if ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  2. Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial transactions for its members. Established in 1973, the ...
  3. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles - GAAP

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures that companies use to compile their financial statements. ...
  4. DuPont Analysis

    A method of performance measurement that was started by the DuPont Corporation in the 1920s. With this method, assets are ...
  5. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) to buy a stock, bond, commodity, or other instrument ...
  6. Economies Of Scale

    Economies of scale is the cost advantage that arises with increased output of a product. Economies of scale arise because ...
Trading Center