Trust Certificate

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Trust Certificate'

A bond or debt investment, usually in a public corporation, that is backed by other assets which serve a purpose similar to collateral. If the company experiences difficulty making payments, the assets may be seized or sold to help specific trust certificate holders recover a portion of their investment. The potential type of company assets used to create a trust certificate can vary, but most typically are other shares of company stock or physical equipment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trust Certificate'

Investors holding trust certificates usually experience a higher level of safety than investors owning unsecured or uncollateralized bonds. But, they also typically earn a lower level of interest than those investors willing to take greater risks. While that may sound like an attractive balance for some investors, investing in trust certificates can be complex because it requires both an understanding of a company's overall financial situation and the nature of the asset that underlies the trust certificate.

Special caution should be taken when investing in trust certificates with an underlying asset that is the same company's stock. If the company runs into financial trouble, the asset backing the trust certificate can become as worthless as the trust certificate itself.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Incorporated Trustee

    A corporation, usually a trust company, which is named as the ...
  2. Trust

    A fiduciary relationship in which one party, known as a trustor, ...
  3. Secured Debt

    Debt backed or secured by collateral to reduce the risk associated ...
  4. Collateral Trust Bond

    A bond that is secured by a financial asset - such as stock or ...
  5. Unsecured Loan

    A loan that is issued and supported only by the borrower's creditworthiness, ...
  6. Equipment Trust Certificate

    A debt instrument that allows a company to take possession of ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is term structure theory of importance to economists?

    The term structure theory, also known as the term structure of interest rates, is important to economists because it lets ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do economists think it is important to track discretionary income?

    Economists track discretionary, and disposable, income as a proxy for the growth in the financial health of average citizens ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the most popular companies in the retail sector?

    Examples of popular companies in the retail sector include Costco, Nordstrom Rack, J. Crew, Sephora, Ikea, The Container ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between disposable and discretionary income?

    According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, or BEA, disposable income is the amount of money an individual takes home after ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you calculate GDP with the expenditures approach?

    To calculate gross domestic product, or GDP, with the expenditures approach, add up the sums of all consumer spending, government ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the top high yield bond ETFs?

    Three of the most popular high-yield bond exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are the Peritus High Yield ETF (HYLD), the SPDR ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    3 Bonds You May Have Never Heard Of

    These lesser-known bonds may give your portfolio a boost when other investments products fall short.
  3. Insurance

    Investing In Securitized Products

    Securitized assets are customizable and have a wide range of yields, making them an attractive asset class.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  5. Retirement

    Collateralized Debt Obligations: From Boon To Burden

    CDOs were to be Wall Street's boon - instead they went bust. Find out what went wrong.
  6. Economics

    What Should Everyone Know About Greece’s Debt

    We weigh in on the top four things everyone should know about Greece's debt.
  7. Retirement

    I Maxed Out My 401(k)! Now What?

    Fear not: There are smart ways to ensure that your retirement nest egg keeps growing.
  8. Credit & Loans

    Smart Ways to Use a Mortgage Calculator

    When you're buying a home, it's essential to do due diligence about the true costs. Mortgage calculators will show you if you can afford the purchase.
  9. Retirement

    Can You Retire in Myanmar Yet?

    A stash of $200,000 could go a long way in Myanmar (Burma). But for now, it's a place for retirees to visit, not settle down.
  10. Chart Advisor

    Watch These Stocks For Breakouts Right Now

    Breakouts are imminent in these four stocks, leading to potential buying, selling or short selling opportunities.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  2. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  3. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  4. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  5. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  6. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!