Trust Property

DEFINITION of 'Trust Property'

Assets that have been placed into a fiduciary relationship between a trustor and trustee for a beneficiary. Trust property may include any type of asset, such as cash, securities, real estate or life insurance policies.

Also be called "trust assets", "principal" or "trust corpus".

BREAKING DOWN 'Trust Property'

Trusts are an estate planning tool used to facilitate the transfer of assets and to reduce tax liability. Some trusts can also protect assets in the event of a bankruptcy or lawsuit. Trusts help to preserve the full value of assets and ensure that those assets are distributed to their intended recipients. The trustee is required to manage the trust property in accordance with the trustor's wishes, the beneficiary's best interests and the rules of the specific type of trust that has been established.

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RELATED FAQS
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  4. What are the requirements that a trust needs to meet to be qualified?

    The requirements that a trust must meet to be qualified are as follows: The trust must be a valid trust under state law or ... Read Answer >>
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