Trust Receipt


DEFINITION of 'Trust Receipt'

Notice of the release merchandise to a buyer from a bank, with the bank retaining the ownership title to the released assets. In an arrangement involving a trust receipt, the bank remains the owner of the merchandise, but the buyer is allowed to hold the merchandise in trust for the bank, for manufacturing or sales purposes.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trust Receipt'

The buyer of merchandise subject to a trust receipt is required to maintain the merchandise, and any proceeds' of the sale of the merchandise, for remittance to the bank. In this way, the buyer is permitted use of the merchandise for their business activities, but the bank's interest in the ownership of the merchandise is protected.

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