Trust Indenture Act of 1939

DEFINITION of 'Trust Indenture Act of 1939'

A law passed in 1939 that prohibits bond issues valued at over $5 million from being offered for sale without a formal written agreement (an indenture), signed by both the bond issuer and the bondholder, that fully discloses the particulars of the bond issue. The act also requires that a trustee be appointed for all bond issues, so that the rights of bondholders are not compromised.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trust Indenture Act of 1939'

The Trust Indenture Act of 1939 was passed for the protection of bond investors. In the event that a bond issuer becomes insolvent, the appointed trustee may be given the right to seize the bond issuer's assets and sell them in order to recoup the bondholders' investments.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  2. Indenture

    A legal and binding contract between a bond issuer and the bondholders. ...
  3. SEC Form T-2

    A statement of eligibility for an individual trustee that must ...
  4. SEC Form T-1

    A statement of eligibility for an individual trustee that must ...
  5. Trust

    A fiduciary relationship in which one party, known as a trustor, ...
  6. Trustee

    A person or firm that holds or administers property or assets ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    The Advantages Of Bonds

    Bonds contribute an element of stability to almost any portfolio and offer a safe and conservative investment.
  2. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  3. Retirement

    Bond Basics Tutorial

    Investing in bonds - What are they, and do they belong in your portfolio?
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    5 Vanguard Fixed Income Fund Underperformers

    Learn about three Vanguard fixed income mutual funds that underperform compared to their benchmark indexes. Find out why low expense ratios are important.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 Allianz Funds for Retirement Diversification in 2016

    Discover the top three Allianz funds for retirement diversification in 2016, with a summary of the portfolio's managers, performance and risk measures.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    3 PIMCO Funds Rated 5 Stars by Morningstar

    Learn about three fixed income mutual funds managed by Pacific Investment Management Company (PIMCO) that have received five-star overall ratings from Morningstar.
  7. Taxes

    Why People Renounce Their U.S Citizenship

    This year, the highest number of Americans ever took the irrevocable step of giving up their citizenship. Here's why.
  8. Personal Finance

    What it Takes to Get a Green Card

    Grounds for getting a green card include having family members in the U.S., being a certain type of refugee or specialized worker, or winning a lottery.
  9. Investing

    How Rising Interest Rates Affect Junk Bonds

    We examine the impact of rising interest rates on higher-yielding bonds.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 4 Best Fidelity Funds for Income Seekers in 2016

    Discover the four best fixed-income mutual funds administered and managed by Fidelity Investments suitable for income-seeking investors.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the Writ of Mandamus?

    A writ of mandamus is a court order issued by a judge at a petitioner’s request compelling someone to execute a duty he is ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    The average Social Security disability benefit amount for a recipient of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) in 2 ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens if property is wrongfully escheated?

    If your financial accounts, such as bank, investment or savings accounts, are declared dormant and the managing financial ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  2. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  3. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  4. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  5. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  6. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
Trading Center