Trustor

DEFINITION of 'Trustor'

An individual or organization that gifts funds or assets to others by transferring fiduciary duty to a third party trustee that will maintain the assets for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trustor'

Also referred to as a grantor, the trustor is the party that generally donates or gifts assets to others.

RELATED TERMS
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    A straightforward type of trust into which a trustor transfers ...
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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is fiduciary duty so important?

    Find out why fiduciary duty is so important, including what this legal obligation entails and an example of how it can affect ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of fiduciary duty?

    Understand what it means to be a fiduciary, under what circumstances fiduciary duties arise and some common examples of fiduciary ... Read Answer >>
  3. Can I give stock as a gift?

    Stocks, bonds or any other securities can be transferred as gifts. Giving the gift of stock also has benefits for the giver. ... Read Answer >>
  4. Why do financial advisors have a fiduciary responsibility?

    Find out why financial advisors have a fiduciary duty to their clients, including what fiduciary duty entails and an example ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is fiduciary liability insurance, and what are its benefits?

    Understand what fiduciary liability insurance is, what companies or individuals can benefit from having it, and when it is ... Read Answer >>
  6. My company is the trustee of our 401k plan (which has 112 participants). What are ...

    The answer may vary depending on the plan provider and the provisions of the plan document. For questions relating to a specific ... Read Answer >>
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