Trustor

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DEFINITION of 'Trustor'

An individual or organization that gifts funds or assets to others by transferring fiduciary duty to a third party trustee that will maintain the assets for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trustor'

Also referred to as a grantor, the trustor is the party that generally donates or gifts assets to others.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What does U.S. law say about contingent beneficiaries?

    In the United States, posthumous asset transfers only require the listing of a primary beneficiary. Contingent beneficiaries ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I change my contingent beneficiary?

    Keeping your beneficiary designations up to date is an important aspect of comprehensive estate planning. Listing a primary ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. If both the primary and contingent beneficiaries are unavailable, what happens to ...

    One of the most common mistakes in estate planning is not keeping beneficiary designations up to date on life insurance policies ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What kinds of assets can be included in a revocable trust?

    A revocable trust is an important part of estate planning. The trust document allows a living grantor to receive income from ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you set up a revocable trust?

    A revocable living trust (RLT) is an arrangement in which a grantor transfers ownership of property through a trust. The ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What types of insurance policies have contingent beneficiaries?

    A contingent beneficiary is a person designated to receive the benefits of an insurance policy or retirement account if the ... Read Full Answer >>
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