Trust Preferred Securities - TruPS

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Trust Preferred Securities - TruPS'

A security similar to debentures and preferreds that is generally longer term, has early redemption features, makes quarterly fixed interest payments, and matures at face value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trust Preferred Securities - TruPS'

TruPS have been created by companies for their favorable accounting treatments and flexibility. Specifically, these securities are taxed like debt obligations by the IRS while maintaining the appearance of equities in a company's accounting statements as according to GAAP procedures.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Convertible Debenture

    A type of loan issued by a company that can be converted into ...
  2. Face Value

    The nominal value or dollar value of a security stated by the ...
  3. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
  4. Internal Revenue Service - IRS

    A United States government agency that is responsible for the ...
  5. Equity Unit Investment Trust

    A registered trust in which investors purchase units from a fixed ...
  6. Debenture

    A type of debt instrument that is not secured by physical assets ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Bond Basics Tutorial

    Investing in bonds - What are they, and do they belong in your portfolio?
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard Total Bond Market

    Learn about the Vanguard Total Bond Market exchange-traded fund, its primary portfolio holdings and risk/reward profile based on its past performance.
  3. Investing

    Is There Still Opportunity in Japanese Stocks?

    Japanese stocks’ strong performance has prompted market watchers to question whether there’s still a case for adding exposure to the Land of the Rising Sun
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What are Floating-Rate Notes?

    A floating-rate note is a debt instrument with an interest rate that “floats,” or varies. They are also called floaters.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Common Size Income Statement

    A common size income statement expresses each account as a percentage of net sales.
  6. Professionals

    What Does an Auditor Do?

    An auditor ensures that organizations maintain accurate and honest financial records.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Net Debt to EBITDA Ratio

    Financial analysts typically use the net debt to EBITDA ratio to determine a company’s ability to pay its debt.
  8. Economics

    How Does an Operating Lease Work?

    Operating lease is a term used mostly in accounting to denote a lease that gives the lessee rights to use and operate an asset without ownership.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Historical Cost

    Historical cost equals the original purchase price of an asset recorded on a company’s balance sheet.
  10. Economics

    What's Recorded in a Cash Book?

    A cash book is an accounting book that records all cash receipts and cash payments before they’re recorded in a business’s general ledger.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  2. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  3. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  4. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  5. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  6. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!