Toronto Stock Exchange - TSX

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DEFINITION of 'Toronto Stock Exchange - TSX'

The largest stock exchange in Canada. The Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) was established in 1852 and formally incorporated in 1878. The exchange is located on Bay Street in Toronto and is owned and operated by the TMX Group.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Toronto Stock Exchange - TSX'

The Toronto Stock Exchange was formerly the TSE, but now goes by TSX. Also the TMX Group was formally the TSX Group. Canadian exchanges have traditionally been home to a large number of natural resource companies.

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