Trailing Twelve Months - TTM

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DEFINITION of 'Trailing Twelve Months - TTM'

The timeframe of the past 12 months used for reporting financial figures. A company's trailing 12 months is a representation of its financial performance for a 12-month period, but typically not at its fiscal year end. Since quarterly reports rarely report how the company has done in the past 12 months, TTM tends to be calculated manually or found on various websites.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trailing Twelve Months - TTM'

Trailing 12 months figures can be calculated by subtracting the previous year's results from the same quarter as the most recent quarter reported and adding the difference to the latest fiscal year end results.


TTM figures are also often used to calculate financial ratios. For example, the price/earnings ratio is often quoted as P/E (ttm), meaning they're using the EPS from the past 12 months.

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