Tuck-In Acquisition

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DEFINITION of 'Tuck-In Acquisition'

The acquisition of a company made for the sole purpose of merging it into a division of the acquirer. Sometimes referred to as "bolt-on acquisitions."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tuck-In Acquisition'

This type of corporate strategy is generally used to acquire companies with technological breakthroughs or comparative advantages at a cost less than implementing the changes themselves.

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