Turnaround

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DEFINITION of 'Turnaround'

The financial recovery of a company that has been performing poorly for an extended time. In order to effect a turnaround, a company must acknowledge and identify its problems, consider changes in management and develop and implement a problem-solving strategy. In some cases, the best strategy may be to cut losses by liquidating the company rather than trying to turn it around.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Turnaround'

Possible characteristics of a troubled company in need of a turnaround include revenues that do not cover costs, an inability to pay creditors, layoffs, salary cuts for officers and a significant decline in stock price. Poor management and/or social, technological and competitive changes may have caused the products or services the company sells to be perceived as subpar by consumers. A speculator may profit from a turnaround if he or she accurately anticipates the improvement of a poorly performing company.

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