Tweezer

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DEFINITION of 'Tweezer'

A pattern found in technical analysis of options trading. Tweezer patterns occur when two or more candlesticks touch the same bottom for a tweezer bottom pattern or top for a tweezer top pattern. This type of pattern can be made with candlestick charts of various types.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tweezer'

Tweezer bottoms are considered to be short-term bullish reversal patterns. Tops are bearish, and either end means that buyers or sellers were not able to push the top or bottom any further. Both types of patterns require close observation and research in order to be interpreted and used correctly.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How are Tweezer patterns interpreted by analysts and traders?

    The tweezer is a very common candlestick pattern. Theoretically, this pattern is an indication that the current trend has ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How effective is creating trade entries after spotting a Tweezer pattern?

    Despite being very common, the tweezer candlestick pattern is not a reliable basis for trade entry. Though it is typically ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why does the efficient market hypothesis state that technical analysis is bunk?

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) suggests that markets are informationally efficient. This means that historical prices ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between in the money and out of the money?

    In options trading, the difference between "in the money" and "out of the money" is a matter of the strike price's position ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Determining the present value of a given cash flow is based on the concept that money today is inherently worth more than ... Read Full Answer >>
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