Tweezer

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Tweezer'

A pattern found in technical analysis of options trading. Tweezer patterns occur when two or more candlesticks touch the same bottom for a tweezer bottom pattern or top for a tweezer top pattern. This type of pattern can be made with candlestick charts of various types.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tweezer'

Tweezer bottoms are considered to be short-term bullish reversal patterns. Tops are bearish, and either end means that buyers or sellers were not able to push the top or bottom any further. Both types of patterns require close observation and research in order to be interpreted and used correctly.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Put Option

    An option contract giving the owner the right, but not the obligation, ...
  2. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  3. Options Contract

    A contract that allows the holder to buy or sell an underlying ...
  4. Option Chain

    A form of quoting options prices through a list of all of the ...
  5. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) ...
  6. Candlestick

    A chart that displays the high, low, opening and closing prices ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do I build a profitable strategy when spotting a Tweezer pattern?

    The key to building a profitable trade strategy based on a tweezer pattern is establishing sufficient confirmation of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How are Tweezer patterns interpreted by analysts and traders?

    The tweezer is a very common candlestick pattern. Theoretically, this pattern is an indication that the current trend has ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How effective is creating trade entries after spotting a Tweezer pattern?

    Despite being very common, the tweezer candlestick pattern is not a reliable basis for trade entry. Though it is typically ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Backspreads: Good News For Breakout Traders

    This bullish trading strategy offers unlimited potential profit with limited risk.
  2. Options & Futures

    Vertical Bull and Bear Credit Spreads

    This trading strategy is an excellent limited-risk strategy that can be used with equity as well as commodity and futures options.
  3. Options & Futures

    Do Option Sellers Have a Trading Edge?

    Take a look at a study that discovered that three out of every four options expired worthless.
  4. Options & Futures

    An Option Strategy for Trading Market Bottoms

    The reverse calendar spreads offers a low-risk trading setup that has profit potential in both directions.
  5. Options & Futures

    The ABCs Of Option Volatility

    The mystery of options pricing can often be explained by a look at implied volatility (IV).
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Present Value Interest Factor of Annuity (PVIFA)

    PVIFA can be used to calculate the present value of a series of annuities by considering cash flows and depreciation.
  8. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  9. Economics

    What are Barriers to Entry?

    A barrier to entry is any obstacle that restricts or impedes a company’s efforts to enter an industry.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  2. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  3. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  4. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  5. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  6. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!