Two-Sided Market


DEFINITION of 'Two-Sided Market'

A market in which market makers (or specialists) are required to give both a firm bid and firm ask for each security in which they make a market. In other words, those making the market must be willing to both buy and sell at the prices they quote.

Also known as a "two-way market".

BREAKING DOWN 'Two-Sided Market'

People mainly use this term in the context of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) requirement that Nasdaq market makers give both a firm bid and firm ask for each security in which they make a market. However, this term can also be applied in the bond market. For example, some broker-dealers make two-sided markets on larger, actively traded bonds and rarely make a two-sided market in inactively traded bonds. The theory is that this helps to enhance liquidity and market efficiency.

  1. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  2. Nasdaq

    A global electronic marketplace for buying and selling securities, ...
  3. Winner-Takes-All Market

    A market in which the best performers are able to capture a very ...
  4. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    Over-The-Counter (or OTC) is a security traded in some context ...
  5. One-Sided Market

    When the market for a security only shows either one bid or one ...
  6. Market Maker

    A broker-dealer firm that accepts the risk of holding a certain ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Getting To Know The Stock Exchanges

    Here are the answers to all the questions you have about stock exchanges but are too afraid to ask!
  2. Investing Basics

    Understanding Order Execution

    Find out the various ways in which a broker can fill an order, which can affect costs.
  3. Investing Basics

    3 Key Signs Of A Market Top

    When stocks rise or fall, the financial fate of investors change, as well. There are certain signs that can reveal a stock’s course, and investors don’t need to be experts to spot them.
  4. Investing

    Asset Manager Ethics: Rules Governing Capital Markets

    The integrity of the capital markets needs to be kept at utmost importance for all investors. This article shows how to maintain the integrity while investing.
  5. Economics

    The 5 Countries That Produce the Most Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

    Learn about the top five countries, China, the United States, India, Russia and Japan, that are the largest contributors to carbon dioxide emissions.
  6. Economics

    Explaining the Tier 1 Leverage Ratio

    The Tier 1 leverage ratio measures a bank’s core capital against its total assets.
  7. Investing Basics

    What Is Schedule 13G Used For?

    Schedule 13G is an SEC form an investor must file upon taking ownership of 5% or more of a company’s outstanding shares.
  8. Investing News

    Understand the SEC Rules on Equity Crowdfunding

    The SEC's adoption of equity crowdfunding rules, initiated under the JOBS Act, enables small investors to invest in companies that show early potential.
  9. Investing Basics

    How to Vet Financial Advisors Via BrokerCheck

    Many people research restaurants or movies, but few select brokers or financial advisors with much research. Here's how BrokerCheck can help.
  10. Investing Basics

    Tax-Efficient Strategies For International Clients

    In a globalized world, international clients seek to diversify holdings by accessing U.S. markets. Creative strategies will help optimize tax positioning.
  1. What happens to a 529A account when the beneficiary dies?

    According to the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act), when the designated beneficiary of a 529A account ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can you have more than one 529A account?

    According to the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 (ABLE Act), a disabled person can generally set up only one ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do financial advisors need to pass the Series 7 exam?

    The exact nature of a financial advisor's job responsibilities determines whether he must have a Series 7 license. If a financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How often do mutual funds report their holdings?

    The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires mutual funds to report complete lists of their holdings on a quarterly ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do financial advisors need to be approved by FINRA?

    The term "financial advisor" can refer to a couple of different roles. It most often refers to a broker-dealer or an investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Ex Works (EXW)

    An international trade term requiring the seller to make goods ready for pickup at his or her own place of business. All ...
  2. Letter of Intent - LOI

    A document outlining the terms of an agreement before it is finalized. LOIs are usually not legally binding in their entirety. ...
  3. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  4. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  5. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  6. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!