Unadjusted Basis

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DEFINITION

A basis used for depreciation purposes. Unadjusted basis uses the original cost of property or equipment without regard to salvage value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

This method of calculating depreciation is used for accelerated cost recovery systems (ACRS) and modified accelerated cost recovery systems (MACRS).


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