Unamortized Bond Discount

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DEFINITION of 'Unamortized Bond Discount'

An accounting methodology for certain bonds. The unamortized bond discount is the difference between the par of a bond - the value of the bond at maturity - and the proceeds from the sale of the bond by the issuing company, less the portion that has already been amortized on the profit and loss statement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unamortized Bond Discount'

The discount refers to the difference in the cost to purchase a bond (its market price) and its par, or face value. The issuing company can choose to expense the entire amount of the discount, or can handle the discount as an asset to be amortized. Any amount that has yet to be expensed is referred to as the unamortized bond discount.

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