Unamortized Bond Discount


DEFINITION of 'Unamortized Bond Discount'

An accounting methodology for certain bonds. The unamortized bond discount is the difference between the par of a bond - the value of the bond at maturity - and the proceeds from the sale of the bond by the issuing company, less the portion that has already been amortized on the profit and loss statement.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unamortized Bond Discount'

The discount refers to the difference in the cost to purchase a bond (its market price) and its par, or face value. The issuing company can choose to expense the entire amount of the discount, or can handle the discount as an asset to be amortized. Any amount that has yet to be expensed is referred to as the unamortized bond discount.

  1. Maturity

    The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. ...
  2. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  3. Amortization

    1. The paying off of debt in regular installments over a period ...
  4. Par

    1. The face value of a bond. Generally $1,000 for corporate issues, ...
  5. Average Life

    The length of time the principal of a debt issue is expected ...
  6. Municipal Bond

    A debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Basics Of Federal Bond Issues

    Treasuries are considered the safest investments, but they should still be analyzed when issued.
  2. Investing

    The Advantages Of Bonds

    Bonds contribute an element of stability to almost any portfolio and offer a safe and conservative investment.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Asset Allocation In A Bond Portfolio

    An investor's fixed-income portfolio can easily beat the average bond fund. Learn how and why!
  5. Home & Auto

    The Bear On Bonds

    Bond investing is a stable and low-risk way to diversify a portfolio. However, knowing which types of bonds are right for you is not always easy.
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Advanced Bond Concepts

    Learn the complex concepts and calculations for trading bonds including bond pricing, yield, term structure of interest rates and duration.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 Muni California Mutual Funds

    Discover analyses of the top three California municipal bond mutual funds, and learn about their characteristics, historical performance and suitability.
  8. Professionals

    Career Advice: Accountant Vs. Financial Planner

    Identify the key differences between a career in accounting and financial planning, and learn how your personality dictates which is the better choice for you.
  9. Savings

    Become Your Own Financial Advisor

    If you have some financial know-how, you don’t have to hire someone to advise you on investments. This tutorial will help you set goals – and get started.
  10. Investing Basics

    What Does Plain Vanilla Mean?

    Plain vanilla is a term used in investing to describe the most basic types of financial instruments.
  1. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the risks of annuities in a recession?

    Annuities come in several forms, the two most common being fixed annuities and variable annuities. During a recession, variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are high yield bonds a good investment?

    Bonds are rated according to their risk of default by independent credit rating agencies such as Moody's, Standard & ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do mutual funds invest only in stocks?

    Mutual funds invest in stocks, but certain types also invest in government and corporate bonds. Stocks are subject to the ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  2. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  3. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  5. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  6. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!