Unannualized

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DEFINITION of 'Unannualized'

A rate of return on an investment for a period other than one year. An unannualized return may be used to report results for a month, quarter or for several years. When the returns on a particular investment are converted to reflect the rate on an annual basis, it is referred to as the annualized return.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unannualized'

It is sometimes difficult to compare unannualized rates because of different time periods; therefore, some people annualize the return so that it can be compared to other companies or returns. However, annualized rates are only estimates. For example, if the return for January was 1%, this would be the unannualized return, the annualized return without compounding is 12%.

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