Underlying Security

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Underlying Security'

The security on which a derivative derives its value. For example, a call option on Google stock gives the holder the right, but not the obligation, to purchase Google stock at the price specified in the option contract. In this case, Google stock is the underlying security.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Underlying Security'

In derivative terminology, the underlying security is often referred to simply as "the underlying." An underlying security can be any asset, index, financial instrument or even another derivative. Generally, an underlying security's value should be independently observable by both parties, so that there is no potential for confusion regarding the value of the derivative. Investors dealing in derivatives must closely research the underlying security in order to ensure that they fully understand the factors affecting the value of the derivative.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Basket

    A single unit of at least 15 stocks that are used in program ...
  2. Flow Derivative

    A securitized product that aims to provide maximum leverage. ...
  3. Economic Derivative

    A relatively new form of derivative contract (the first ones ...
  4. Derivative

    A security whose price is dependent upon or derived from one ...
  5. Credit Derivative

    Privately held negotiable bilateral contracts that allow users ...
  6. Underlying

    1. In derivatives, the security that must be delivered when a ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why would a company issue a rights offering?

    Companies most commonly issue a rights offering to raise additional capital. A company may need extra capital to meet its ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between share purchase rights and options?

    There is a big difference between share purchase rights and options. With share purchase rights, the holder may or may not ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do I calculate a forward rate in Excel?

    You need to have the zero-coupon yield curve information to calculate forward rates, even in Microsoft Excel. Once the spot ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. In what ways can a sinking fund affect bond returns?

    The effective yield of a bond sinking fund to an investor should not be considered similar to a bond nonsinking fund. Both ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can delta be used to calculate price volatility of an option?

    The delta of an option is a component of the Black-Scholes option pricing formula, which provides the implied volatility ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Pin Down Stock Price With Real Options

    How can you assign a value to what a company may do with its business in the future? We explain how it works.
  2. Options & Futures

    Are Derivatives Safe For Retail Investors?

    These vehicles have gotten a bad rap in the press. Find out whether they deserve it.
  3. Options & Futures

    Introduction To Weather Derivatives

    Learn about a financial instrument that makes temperature a tradable commodity.
  4. Active Trading

    How Companies Use Derivatives To Hedge Risk

    Derivatives can reduce the risks associated with changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices.
  5. Options & Futures

    Hedge Funds Hunt For Upside, Regardless Of The Market

    Hedge funds seek positive absolute returns, and engage in aggressive strategies to make this happen.
  6. Investing Basics

    Understanding Non-Deliverable Forward (NDF)

    A foreign exchange hedging strategy where the parties agree to settle the profit or loss in a foreign currency futures contract before the expiration date.
  7. Investing

    What More Volatility Means For Momentum Stocks

    One byproduct of the recent tick higher in bond yields: a meaningful rise in volatility for both stocks and bonds.
  8. Options & Futures

    How & Why Interest Rates Affect Options

    The Fed is expected to change interest rates soon. We explain how a change in interest rates impacts option valuations.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining Currency Swaps

    A swap that involves the exchange of principal and interest in one currency for the same in another currency.
  10. Investing Basics

    Understanding Notional Value

    This term is commonly used in the options, futures and currency markets because a very small amount of invested money can control a large position.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  2. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  3. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  4. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  5. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  6. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
Trading Center