Underperform

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DEFINITION of 'Underperform'

An analyst recommendation that means a stock is expected to do slightly worse than the market return.

Also known as market underperform, moderate sell, or weak hold.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Underperform'

Exact definitions vary between brokerages, but in general this rating is worse than neutral but better than sell or strong sell.

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