Uniform Bank Performance Report - UBPR

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DEFINITION

An analaytical tool created by the Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council (FFIEC) to help supervise and examine financial instituions. The Uniform Bank Performance Report (UBPR) serves as an analysis of the impact that management and economic conditions can have on a bank's balance sheet. It examines liquidity, adequacy of capital and earnings and other factors that could damage the stability of the bank.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Bank's traditionally rely heavily on short-term deposits to fund long-term loans to consumers and businesses. This reliance makes a bank susceptible to major problems if conditions turn against it, or it sees a sudden mass withdrawal of deposits. This is why the FFIEC tries to monitor banks' stability with the UBPR.


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