Uniform Bank Performance Report - UBPR

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Uniform Bank Performance Report - UBPR'

An analaytical tool created by the Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council (FFIEC) to help supervise and examine financial instituions. The Uniform Bank Performance Report (UBPR) serves as an analysis of the impact that management and economic conditions can have on a bank's balance sheet. It examines liquidity, adequacy of capital and earnings and other factors that could damage the stability of the bank.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Uniform Bank Performance Report - UBPR'

Bank's traditionally rely heavily on short-term deposits to fund long-term loans to consumers and businesses. This reliance makes a bank susceptible to major problems if conditions turn against it, or it sees a sudden mass withdrawal of deposits. This is why the FFIEC tries to monitor banks' stability with the UBPR.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Capital

    1) Financial assets or the financial value of assets, such as ...
  2. Federal Financial Institutions ...

    An interagency body of the U.S. government made up of several ...
  3. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  4. Deposit

    1. A transaction involving a transfer of funds to another party ...
  5. Liquidity

    1. The degree to which an asset or security can be bought or ...
  6. Structured Transaction

    A series of transactions that could have been treated as a single ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does your checking account affect your credit score?

    Your credit report provides a snapshot for prospective lenders, landlords and employers of how you handle credit. For any ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the banking sector?

    The banking sector is the section of the economy devoted to the holding of financial assets for others, investing those financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between a letter of credit and a bank guarantee?

    Bank guarantees represent a more significant contractual obligation for banks than letters of credit do. A letter of credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do leverage ratios help to regulate how much banks lend or invest?

    Banks are among the most leveraged institutions in the United States; the combination of fractional-reserve banking and Federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What’s the difference between overdraft protection and overdraft settings?

    Overdrafting refers to the practice of granting short-term credit to an account holder when his or her balance reaches zero. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can I use a prepaid credit card to pay bills or to transfer money to other accounts?

    Prepaid credit cards may be used to both pay bills, either as a one-time transaction or recurring transaction, and to transfer ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  2. Credit & Loans

    The Evolution Of Banking

    Banks are a part of ancient history. Find out how this system of money management developed into what we know today.
  3. Personal Finance

    How Basel 1 Affected Banks

    This 1988 agreement sought to decrease the potential for bankruptcy among major international banks.
  4. Savings

    Explaining Term Deposits

    A term deposit (more often called a certificate of deposit or CD) is a deposit account that is made for a specific period of time.
  5. Savings

    Bank Lingo: Routing Number Vs. Account Number

    Each consumer bank account has its own personal ID. And so does the bank. How do these numbers function and how do they protect the account holder?
  6. Investing Basics

    Do You Know These Odd Investing & Business Terms?

    Think investment talk is boring? There are plenty of terms to liven up any conversation about Wall Street and finance. You should try some of them out.
  7. Credit & Loans

    What is a Financial Institution?

    A financial institution is in business to, among other things, accept deposits, make loans, exchange currencies, and broker investment securities.
  8. Economics

    What Does Principal Mean?

    For banks, principal refers to the amount due on a loan, and is used to calculate interest payments.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Prime Rate

    Prime rate is the interest rate banks charge their best (e.g. prime) customers.
  10. Economics

    What Does a Creditor Do?

    A creditor is a person or entity that loans money or provides goods or services to another entity with the expectation of being paid back in the future.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  2. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  3. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  4. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  5. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  6. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!