Uniform Bill Of Lading


DEFINITION of 'Uniform Bill Of Lading'

An agreement between an exporter and a carrier regarding property to be transported. The uniform bill of lading provides basic information about the shipment such as the shipper and recipient's names, and the shipment's origin and destination. In addition, it establishes the terms of the carrier's liability, transport time frame, how to file a claim for a lost or damaged shipment, how insurance will be applied in the event of a claim, and how the shipment may be stored or disposed of if the shipment is refused or is not deliverable.

BREAKING DOWN 'Uniform Bill Of Lading'

The uniform bill of lading also specifies the carrier's liability with regard to specific types of shipments, including documents, coin money, items of extraordinary value and explosives. Additional shipment charges may be assessed if the shipper misrepresents the type of goods being transported.

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