Uniform Consumer Credit Code - UCCC

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DEFINITION of 'Uniform Consumer Credit Code - UCCC'

A code of conduct that governs consumer credit transactions. The Uniform Consumer Credit Code (UCCC) provides guidelines for the purchase and use of all types of credit products. It is intended to protect consumers who use various types of credit from fraud and misinformation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Uniform Consumer Credit Code - UCCC'

The National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws originally approved the UCCC in 1968. The Code has been adopted in a limited number states, and many others have incorporated at least some of its provisions into their own laws. One of its key provisions is the limitation of rates charged to consumers by lenders.

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