Uniform Simultaneous Death Act


DEFINITION of 'Uniform Simultaneous Death Act '

A law used to determine the inheritance when more than one death occurs at the same time. The Uniform Simultaneous Death Act states that if two or more people died simultaneously due to an accident, within an 120 hour survival period, with no will, their assets are passed to the relatives rather than from one estate to another. This act is used to avoid double administrative costs.

BREAKING DOWN 'Uniform Simultaneous Death Act '

For example, if a husband and wife are involved in a plane crash, with one pronounced dead at the scene and the other dying one day later, the Uniform Simultaneous Death Act would be enacted. In this case the assets are combined and distributed to the relatives of both individual's equally rather than all assets being transfer to the one who died one day later's estate first and all the assets being distributed only to that person's relative(s).

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