Unilateral Transfer

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DEFINITION of 'Unilateral Transfer'

An economic transactions between residents of two nations over a stipulated period of time, usually a calendar year. Typically, these transactions consist of gift exchanges, pension payments and the like, but they can encompass other goods and services as well.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unilateral Transfer'

Unilateral transfers are included in the current account of a nation's balance of payments. They are distinct from international trade, encompassing such things as humanitarian aid and payments made by immigrants to their former country of residence.

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