Unilateral Transfer

DEFINITION of 'Unilateral Transfer'

An economic transactions between residents of two nations over a stipulated period of time, usually a calendar year. Typically, these transactions consist of gift exchanges, pension payments and the like, but they can encompass other goods and services as well.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unilateral Transfer'

Unilateral transfers are included in the current account of a nation's balance of payments. They are distinct from international trade, encompassing such things as humanitarian aid and payments made by immigrants to their former country of residence.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Balance Of Payments (BOP)

    A record of all transactions made between one particular country ...
  2. Current Account

    The difference between a nation’s savings and its investment. ...
  3. Foreign Exchange

    The exchange of one currency for another, or the conversion of ...
  4. Transfer

    A change in ownership of an asset, or a movement of funds and/or ...
  5. Gift

    Property, money or assets that one person transfers to another ...
  6. The sale of a home made to a family member or someone with whom ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is The Balance Of Payments?

    The balance of payments helps countries to track how much money is coming in and how much money is going out. Learn more about BOPs here.
  2. Economics

    Exploring The Current Account In The Balance Of Payments

    Learn how a country's current account balance reflects the country's economic health.
  3. Budgeting

    Current Account Deficits: Government Investment Or Irresponsibility?

    Deficit can be a sign of trouble for some countries, and of health for others. Find out what it means when more funds are exiting than entering a nation.
  4. Investing News

    How Interest Rates Can Go Negative

    Central banks from Europe to Japan have implemented a negative interest rate policy (NIRP) in order to stimulate economic growth.
  5. Economics

    The Delicate Dance of Inflation and GDP

    Investors must understand inflation and gross domestic product, or GDP, well enough to make decisions without becoming buried in data.
  6. Economics

    Industries That Thrive On Recession

    Recessions are not equally hard on everyone. In fact, there are some industries that even flourish amid the adversity.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

    Business managers use cost-volume profit analysis to gauge the profitability of their company’s products or services.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Must-Have Metrics For Value Investors

    Focusing on certain fundamental metrics is the best way for value investors to cash in gains. Here are the most important metrics to know.
  9. Stock Analysis

    6 Risks International Stocks Face in 2016

    Learn about risk factors that can influence your investment in foreign stocks and funds, and what regions are more at-risk than others.
  10. Investing

    3 Things About International Investing and Currency

    As world monetary policy continues to diverge rocking bottom on interest rates while the Fed raises them, expect currencies to continue their bumpy ride.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Is a deficit in the balance of payments a bad thing?

    First, it's important to distinguish between the balance of payments and the current account. When the terms "trade deficit" ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is comparative advantage?

    Comparative advantage is an economic law that demonstrates the ways in which protectionism (mercantilism, at the time it ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the Wall Street Journal prime rate forecast work?

    The prime rate forecast is also known as the consensus prime rate, or the average prime rate defined by the Wall Street Journal ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What's the difference between microeconomics and macroeconomics?

    Microeconomics is generally the study of individuals and business decisions, macroeconomics looks at higher up country and ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do mutual funds work in India?

    Mutual funds in India work in much the same way as mutual funds in the United States. Like their American counterparts, Indian ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  2. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  3. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  4. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  5. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
Trading Center