Unit Cost

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DEFINITION of 'Unit Cost'

The cost incurred by a company to produce, store and sell one unit of a particular product. Unit costs include all fixed costs (i.e. plant and equipment) and all variable costs (labor, materials, etc.) involved in production.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unit Cost'

Unit cost is an important metric to look at when evaluating a "unit grower" stock, or a stock that chiefly produces items that have a low fixed cost. Generally, the larger a company grows, the lower the unit cost it can achieve through economies of scale.

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