United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL

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DEFINITION of 'United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL'

A United Nations-sponsored commission that seeks to create a forum for countries to come together and set international trade law standards. The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) meets annually to discuss matters of international trade, with meetings alternating between Austria and the United States. Working groups meet outside the annual conference.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL'

UNCITRAL was established by the UN General Assembly in 1966. The rise of international trade during the 20th century necessitated that countries cooperate in order to increase trade efficiencies and reduce the possibility of a trade way. While the commission has a set membership, non-member countries and organizations are able to contribute during the work sessions but are not allowed to vote.

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