United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL


DEFINITION of 'United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL'

A United Nations-sponsored commission that seeks to create a forum for countries to come together and set international trade law standards. The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) meets annually to discuss matters of international trade, with meetings alternating between Austria and the United States. Working groups meet outside the annual conference.

BREAKING DOWN 'United Nations Commission on International Trade Law - UNCITRAL'

UNCITRAL was established by the UN General Assembly in 1966. The rise of international trade during the 20th century necessitated that countries cooperate in order to increase trade efficiencies and reduce the possibility of a trade way. While the commission has a set membership, non-member countries and organizations are able to contribute during the work sessions but are not allowed to vote.

  1. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of standardizing ...
  2. Continuous Bond

    A financial guarantee commonly used in international trade that ...
  3. Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act

    U.S. law enacted in June 1930 which caused an increase in import ...
  4. Bilateral Trade

    The exchange of goods between two countries. Bilateral trade ...
  5. World Trade Organization - WTO

    An international organization dealing with the global rules of ...
  6. Globalization

    The tendency of investment funds and businesses to move beyond ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Sanctions Between Countries Pack a Bigger Punch Than You Might Think

    In response to Russia's annexation of Crimea, in March 2014 the West slapped sanctions on dozens of Russian hotshots. So what, you ask? Well, sancitons can pack a bigger punch than you might ...
  2. Economics

    Exploring The Current Account In The Balance Of Payments

    Learn how a country's current account balance reflects the country's economic health.
  3. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  4. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  5. Economics

    Do Cheap Imported Goods Cost Americans Jobs?

    Flooding the market with cheap products can mean job losses and even market collapse - but dumping isn't as threatening as it seems.
  6. Investing Basics

    Explaining the Real Effective Exchange Rate

    The REER is a measure of the weighted average of a country’s currency against an inflation-adjusted and trade-weighted index of other currencies.
  7. Investing

    What a Fed Delay Means for the ECB & BoJ

    The Fed’s continued delay has repercussions for more than just the U.S. economy and markets. The ECB and the BoJ may support the case for stocks in Europe.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Income Inequality

    Income inequality refers to the uneven distribution of income across a single economy.
  9. Economics

    Who is a Hawk?

    In the economic sense of the word, a hawk is someone who believes high interest rates should be maintained to keep inflation low.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Fixed Exchange Rates

    A government using a fixed exchange rate has linked the value of its currency to the value of another country’s currency, or the price of gold.
  1. How are joint ventures regulated in the United States?

    Joint ventures are a very specific type of business arrangement. They can be organized in several different legal structures, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the legal regulations on delivery duty paid?

    Legal regulations vary on delivery duty paid (DDP) based on the products being shipped as well as the location they are being ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When do I need a letter of credit?

    A letter of credit, sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight ...

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight (CIF) is essentially the requirement under ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  2. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  3. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  4. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  5. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  6. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!