United States Agency For International Development - USAID

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DEFINITION of 'United States Agency For International Development - USAID'

A U.S. government organization that provides aid to foreign countries. The United States Agency For International Development's (USAID) goal is to foster economic growth and advancements in agriculture, trade, global health, democracy and humanitarian assistance for foreign countries. Some examples of the type of assistance USAID provides are: small-enterprise loans, technical assistance, food and disaster relief, and training and scholarships.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'United States Agency For International Development - USAID'

USAID works in 100 developing countries spanning the globe in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Near East, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe and Eurasia. USAID tries to provide aid through partnerships with companies and other organizations, and has contracts with over 3,500 countries and more than 300 volunteer organizations.

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