United States Agency For International Development - USAID

AAA

DEFINITION of 'United States Agency For International Development - USAID'

A U.S. government organization that provides aid to foreign countries. The United States Agency For International Development's (USAID) goal is to foster economic growth and advancements in agriculture, trade, global health, democracy and humanitarian assistance for foreign countries. Some examples of the type of assistance USAID provides are: small-enterprise loans, technical assistance, food and disaster relief, and training and scholarships.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'United States Agency For International Development - USAID'

USAID works in 100 developing countries spanning the globe in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Near East, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe and Eurasia. USAID tries to provide aid through partnerships with companies and other organizations, and has contracts with over 3,500 countries and more than 300 volunteer organizations.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Balance Of Trade - BOT

    The difference between a country's imports and its exports. Balance ...
  2. Economic Growth Rate

    A measure of economic growth from one period to another in percentage ...
  3. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  4. Economic Growth

    An increase in the capacity of an economy to produce goods and ...
  5. Separation Of Powers

    An organizational structure in which responsibilities, authorities, ...
  6. Nordic Model

    The social welfare and economic systems adopted by Nordic countries.
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Broadening Your Portfolio's Borders

    Find out what type of international fund might suit your needs in gaining exposure to foreign markets.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Getting Into International Investing

    Diversifying can mean not only investing in various asset classes but also venturing beyond domestic exchanges.
  3. Forex Education

    Global Trade And The Currency Market

    Learn how the Bretton Woods system got the ball rolling for world trade.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Playing It Safe In Foreign Stock Markets

    Find out some of the lower-risk ways to invest in foreign markets.
  5. Economics

    How is the invisible hand affected in a communist or socialist economy?

    Discover why the invisible hand of the market is compromised by socialist and communist economies, where the government controls the means of production.
  6. Economics

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on the government?

    Find out why government policy goals are often frustrated by the same forces that guide the invisible hand of the market towards efficient outcomes.
  7. Economics

    How does the invisible hand affect a capitalist economy?

    Take a deeper look at how the invisible hand of the market works and why it is so crucial for understanding how capitalist economies function.
  8. Economics

    What impact does quantitative easing have on consumers in the U.S.?

    Dig deeper into the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing policies and what potential impacts they may have on American consumers.
  9. Economics

    What regulations are in place that affect fracking?

    Read about some of the regulations that impact the practice of hydraulic fracturing, which is used to increase oil and gas well output.
  10. Economics

    What is the role of deficit spending in fiscal policy?

    Read about the role deficit spending can play in a government's fiscal policy, and learn why economists are torn about the efficacy of debt-related stimulus.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center