United States Longshore And Harbor Workers' Compensation Act Of 1927- LHWCA


DEFINITION of 'United States Longshore And Harbor Workers' Compensation Act Of 1927- LHWCA'

A program administered by a division of the United States Department of Labor that offers financial compensation and medical care to certain maritime workers who are disabled from injuries that occur on U.S. navigable waters and adjoining areas for loading, unloading, repairing or building a vessel. The United States Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act first enacted in 1927, provides workers' compensation benefits to maritime workers such as dock workers, Outer Continental Shelf workers, and United States contractors who are working on foreign soil, such as U.S. civilian contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Act also provides benefits to dependents in the event the injury causes the employee's death. Also called the Longshore Act or LHWCA.

BREAKING DOWN 'United States Longshore And Harbor Workers' Compensation Act Of 1927- LHWCA'

The Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act is administered by the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP), Employment Standards Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. A maritime worker who is covered by the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act is generally entitled to compensation benefits equal to two-thirds of his or her average weekly wage while receiving medical treatment. In addition, the worker may receive a scheduled award for injury to body parts, or two thirds of the worker's lost earning capacity.

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