Unitized Endowment Pool - UEP

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DEFINITION of 'Unitized Endowment Pool - UEP'

A form of endowment investing that has mechanics similar to that of a mutual fund. A unitized endowment pool allows multiple endowments to invest in the same pool of assets.

Each endowment owns individual units in the unitized investment pool, and the units are generally valued monthly. New endowments entering the pool can buy in by receiving units in the pool that are valued as of the buy-in date.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unitized Endowment Pool - UEP'

A Unitized Endowment Pool (UEP) can be thought of as a mutual fund on a bigger scale. While even small endowments likely have a substantial amount of cash to invest, it may be beneficial to pool together with other endowments for diversification. Units act like shares in a mutual fund, and also serve to clearly segregate each endowment's share in the pool.

For example, a UEP with market value of $100 million may have 100,000 units that are worth $1,000 each. An endowment with $20,000 can buy 20 units of the pool.

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