Unitranche Debt

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DEFINITION of 'Unitranche Debt'

A type of debt that combines senior and subordinated debt into one debt instrument; it is usually used to facilitate a leveraged buyout. The borrower would pay one interest rate to one lender, and the rate would usually fall between the rate for senior debt and subordinated notes. The unitranche debt instrument was created to simplify debt structure and accelerate the acquisition process.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unitranche Debt'

Unitranche lending has its detractors because the loan is often split between secured and unsecured instruments. The interest rate benefit of a secured debt instrument is at least partially obscured by the increased risk attached to the unsecured portion of the instrument.

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