Unitranche Debt

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DEFINITION of 'Unitranche Debt'

A type of debt that combines senior and subordinated debt into one debt instrument; it is usually used to facilitate a leveraged buyout. The borrower would pay one interest rate to one lender, and the rate would usually fall between the rate for senior debt and subordinated notes. The unitranche debt instrument was created to simplify debt structure and accelerate the acquisition process.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unitranche Debt'

Unitranche lending has its detractors because the loan is often split between secured and unsecured instruments. The interest rate benefit of a secured debt instrument is at least partially obscured by the increased risk attached to the unsecured portion of the instrument.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
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    When capitalizing interest, interest accrues while a person is in a deferment of his loan. In the event of a deferment, the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is more interest paid over the life of a loan when it is capitalized?

    More interest is paid over the life of a loan when that interest is capitalized because the capitalized interest is added ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Two good examples of simple interest loans are simple interest car loans and the interest owed on lines of credit such as ... Read Full Answer >>
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