Unlimited Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Unlimited Risk'

The risk of an investment that has unlimited downside potential.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unlimited Risk'

Examples of investments with inherent unlimited risk include short positions and futures contract trading. In short selling or trading futures contracts, the potential to lose more than your initial investment is theoretically infinite.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How are commodity spot prices different than futures prices?

    Commodity spot prices and futures prices are different quotes for different types of contracts. The spot price is the current ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do commodity spot prices indicate future price movements?

    Commodity spot prices indicate future price movements because commodity futures prices are calculated using spot prices. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where did market to market (MTM) accounting come from?

    Mark to market accounting has been around in concept since the stock market began; however, it was not officially part of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is market to market (MTM) accounting considered controversial?

    Mark to market accounting has been an integral component of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between economic value and market value?

    The difference between market value and economic value is that the former represents the minimum amount the customer is willing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I set a strike price for a future?

    Strike prices can be set for put and call options, but investors engaged in futures contracts are obligated to trade the ... Read Full Answer >>
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