Unloved Stock

Filed Under:
Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Unloved Stock'


A stock that is out of favor with investors. The term unloved stock often refers to stocks that were once popular with investors but have become largely ignored due to a variety of factors. These factors include poor performance, too much volatility, changing regulations, new management, lowered or suspended dividends, inconsistent earnings from quarter to quarter, share price, the company being viewed as too risky or has taken on too much debt or the company simply fell out of favor with investors who decide to sell, resulting in falling stock value. An unloved stock may rebound, or its price could continue to drop and/or trade under decreased volume.
Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Unloved Stock'


Unloved stocks are those that once enjoyed investor attention, but now are disregarded by investors and analysts. Investor attention could be the result of interest brought on by various media sources, or popularity fueled by high-profile investor recommendations. For example, if famed-investor Warren Buffett invests heavily in a relatively unknown company, that company will likely enjoy increased investor attention, resulting in higher trading volume. While some of these ignored stocks do make a comeback and rally to their former popularity, others slowly attract less and less attention. Unloved and out of favor stocks may be sought by value investors who step in and buy stocks while other investors are selling, often at very low prices. Value investing is a strategy that involves selecting stocks that are trading for less than their intrinsic values.
comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  2. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  3. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  4. IPO ETF

    An exchange-traded fund that focuses on stocks that have recently held an initial public offering (IPO). The underlying indexes tracked by IPO ETFs vary from one fund manager to another, but index IPO ETFs are usually passively managed and contain equities that have recently been offered to the public.
  5. IPO ETF

    An exchange-traded fund that focuses on stocks that have recently held an initial public offering (IPO). The underlying indexes tracked by IPO ETFs vary from one fund manager to another, but index IPO ETFs are usually passively managed and contain equities that have recently been offered to the public.
  6. Maritime Law

    A body of laws, conventions and treaties that governs international private business or other matters involving ships, shipping or crimes occurring on open water.
Trading Center