Unrecorded Deed

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DEFINITION of 'Unrecorded Deed'

A deed for a tangible piece of property that is not filed with the appropriate governing body. The deed will transfer ownership of the property from one party to another. The seller of the deed is known as the grantor, and the recipient of the deed is known as the grantee.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unrecorded Deed'

When dealing in real estate and other property-related transactions, it is always important to protect your investment. Under most insurance policies, an unrecorded deed does not entitle the holder to coverage.

If you have an unrecorded deed, it is advisable that you contact an attorney as soon as possible, as it may not legally entitle you to the property you currently believe you own.

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