Unrestricted Cash

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Unrestricted Cash'

Monetary reserves that are not tied to a particular use. Unrestricted cash represents instant reserves, as it can be used for any purpose and is extremely liquid. Often, in order to satisfy debt covenants, firms will have to maintain a certain level of cash on their balance sheets - the amount that exceeds the requirements is referred to as unrestricted cash.


An organization's liquid funds include cash, unrestricted cash, cash equivalents, unrestricted short-term (ST) investments, plus net short-term borrowing capacity.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unrestricted Cash'

Cash and cash equivalents represent the money that an organization can spend now, as they are assets readily available for use. In order to spend more than that, a company will have to take on a higher level of liabilities, such as through loans or accounts receivable. For some organizations with a varying pattern of cash flow, such as a non-profits, unrestricted cash can keep operations active even when funding sources dry up.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Cash Flow

    The net amount of cash and cash-equivalents moving into and out ...
  2. Cash

    Legal tender or coins that can be used in exchange goods, debt, ...
  3. Liquid Asset

    An asset that can be converted into cash quickly and with minimal ...
  4. Liquidity

    1. The degree to which an asset or security can be bought or ...
  5. Illiquid

    The state of a security or other asset that cannot easily be ...
  6. Profit Margin

    A category of ratios measuring profitability calculated as net ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    12 Things You Need To Know About Financial Statements

    Discover how to keep score of companies to increase your chances of choosing a winner.
  2. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  3. Markets

    Operating Cash Flow: Better Than Net Income?

    Differences between accrual accounting and cash flows show why net income is easier to manipulate.
  4. Markets

    Cash: Can A Company Have Too Much?

    Cash is something companies love to have. But if they are not using it there could be problems.
  5. Markets

    What Is A Cash Flow Statement?

    Learn how the CFS relates to the balance sheet and income statement as a part of a company's financial reports.
  6. Investing

    Spotting Cash Cows

    We show you why some of these companies stand apart from the herd.
  7. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Replacement Cost

    The replacement cost is the cost you’d have to pay to replace an asset with a similar asset at the present time and value.
  9. Economics

    How Does National Income Accounting Work?

    National income accounting is an economic term describing the system used by a country to gather data and determine aggregate economic activity.
  10. Investing Basics

    3 Companies That Hate Debt Financing

    Learn how companies such as Chipotle, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Paychex are able to maintain impressive levels of growth without debt financing.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  2. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  3. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  4. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
  5. Wedding Warrant

    A warrant that can only be exercised if the host asset, typically a bond or preferred stock, is surrendered. Until the call ...
  6. Marlboro Friday

    A reference to Friday, April 2, 1993, when Philip Morris, the maker of Marlboro cigarettes, announced that it would be cutting ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!