Unsecured

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DEFINITION of 'Unsecured'

A loan or equity interest that is given without any guarantee of payment, performance, satisfaction or opportunity for return from the recipient. No property, interest or security is used as collateral in either a guarantee or a pledge.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Unsecured'

Unsecured transactions are the most risky for the lending or selling party and least risky for the borrowing or buying party. Lenders or sellers are provided no compensation for default of payment or failed delivery of goods or services.

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