Unsolicited Application

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DEFINITION of 'Unsolicited Application'

1. In insurance, this is a request for life insurance coverage that is made by an individual rather than an insurance agent or broker. Insurers generally scrutinize these applications because of the likelihood of self-selection. Self-selection refers to the probability that individuals with poorer risks will seek insurance on their own instead of through an insurance professional.


2. In a more general sense, this is a form that is filled out or a letter submitted by a job applicant for a position that is not vacant or advertised at the time of submission. Many employers will accept unsolicited applications that go into a general pool of candidates for future reference. An unsolicited application letter is similar to a resume, and typically includes information such as the job seeker's contact information, why he or she would be a good fit for the company, a description of relevant skills and degrees, and the manner(s) in which the individual would be an asset to the organization.

BREAKING DOWN 'Unsolicited Application'

1. A person with a suspected or known health problem, such as heart disease, may try to purchase life insurance before seeking medical treatment for the condition. These applicants could weigh the insured pool towards bad risks, and as such, the insurers try to screen out self-selection applicants either by requiring higher rates or by denying coverage altogether.


2. Often, the job seeker will be asked to send in a resume and cover letter in addition to the company's unsolicited application form. In other instances, the employer does not have a specific form to be filled out, and it is up to the job seeker to draft an appropriate letter indicating the intent to notify the employer of his or her interest in a certain job or type of job within the company.

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